Reshafting a Driver: Step-by-Step Guide and Advice

This article will help you determine the possible costs of customizing your driver and supply you with reshafting instructions in case you decide to do it yourself.
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Last updatedLast updated: April 27, 2022
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Are you looking to reshaft your golf driver? Maybe you have decided to do that, but you aren’t sure if you should bring your driver into a pro shop or do it yourself. It might even be best to toss out the idea of reshafting totally and just buy a brand new driver. This post will highlight whether or not a driver can be reshafted, how much it will cost to reshaft your driver, and whether or not you should reshaft your driver or bring it into a professional. You’ll also find out if it is easier to reshaft your driver or buy a new one.

Can golf drivers be reshafted?

A golf driver can absolutely be reshafted. Reshafting, your golf driver, has many benefits, such as boosting your performance. By reshafting the driver, you will be saving money since it is significantly cheaper than buying a new one.

You may want to consider playing the game with another driver similar in weight to your preferred shaft to see if it is a good fit before permanently reshafting your driver.

Is it difficult?

The process of reshafting a driver is not as complicated as you may think. Although you can bring a golf driver to a repair shop, it is relatively simple to replace it at home. When replacing your shaft at home, though, you have to be careful to follow all of the steps carefully, or else you have risk-averse effects on your golf Trusted Source Netflix teaming up with PGA Tour and golf's majors for 'immersive' docuseries with glittering cast of players - CNN The streaming service announced on Wednesday it will be teaming up with the PGA Tour and golf’s major championships to release an “immersive documentary series.” The series will follow the lives and stories of some of the biggest names in the sport as they compete across the globe during the 2022 season. The announcement revealed the star-studded cast of golfers it would follow, in a series that will be produced in part by the company behind the “Drive to Survive” series in Formula One which has become so popular. www.cnn.com game.

Can you reshaft an adult driver for a child?

Reshafting a Driver: Step-by-Step Guide and Advice

There is a way to overcome this impediment, though. Add some lead tape to the bottom of the driver to add some weight.

Yes, it is possible to reshaft an adult driver for a child. It is best to remember that by reshafting the drive, you considerably lower the swing weight.

How much does it cost to reshaft a driver?

Golf Trusted Source 125 Years After the First College Golf Match, a Rematch On a fall day in 1896, a group of Yale students, caught up in a new sports craze called golf, traveled from their New Haven, Conn., campus by train and stagecoach to a course north of New York City — one of the few clubs in the country at the time — to take on some chaps from Columbia. www.nytimes.com shafts range in price, as do club repairs. There are different variables involved when reshafting a driver. Some shafts cost approximately 400 dollars, while the typical cost is between 20 through 100 dollars. If you choose not to replace reshaft your driver yourself, you may also have to pay labor costs. Labor costs may range from 5 to 35 dollars. You can’t forget that every replacement shaft will need a new grip, and those cost around 8 dollars.

Graphite shafts are more costly than steel ones. The drives sold by the best manufacturers are graphite shafts such as the Callaway Golf 2020 Mavrik Max Driver and the Callaway Big Bertha B21 Driver. Choosing a graphite shaft will be more expensive and add to the cost of reshafting.

Additional costs

In addition to the labor cost and grip, there are other additional costs involved in reshafting your driver. Items you may need to purchase:

  • Tube cutter
  • Graphite shaft extractor
  • Double-sided grip tape
  • Grip solvent
  • Tube of shaft epoxy
  • New driver shaft
  • Piece of cardboard
  • Craft stick
  • Ferrule
Together all of these items will cost approximately 52 to 63 dollars. That is significantly cheaper than buying a new golf driver altogether.

Is it worth it?

Yes, reshafting your driver is worth it whenever you notice one of these changes in your swing:

  • The driver shaft is broken
  • Sudden change in swing speed
  • Ballooning of golf ball

Is it better to reshaft a driver or buy a new one?

Whether or not you reshaft your driver or buy a new one is up to you. If the driver is barely cracked or damaged at either of the two sides, it may be better to reshaft. Nonetheless, if broken down the middle, it will be in your best interests to purchase a new driver. Also, make sure the shaft you want to use for reshafting fits on your clubhead the right way. Buying a new driver may be necessary if the clubhead doesn’t fit and a replacement shaft is required.

Some golfers look for clubs that absorb vibrations or generate a heightened takeoff look for driveshafts with that feature. Go to your local golf club or store and try out an existing driver. You may not be getting that from the golf club you are using now, so in that case, you probably want to buy a new driver.

Benefits of reshafting

An improved increase in performance is a benefit of reshafting a driver. Having a shaft unique to your swing speed and technique and the correct length and weight will improve your driver’s performance. Another benefit of reshafting your driver is that it is cost-saving. Replacing the shaft on a moderately new driver can increase your performance as well as save you money. A great benefit of reshafting is that you get to use a shaft that matches your playing technique. Beware, though, if not done the right way, reshafting may lead to a harmful impact on your golf game.

Ways to save money reshafting your driver

One way to save money reshafting your driver is to check the warranty. By checking the contract, you will find out if the manufacturer will replace the golf driver. You can also save costs by reshafting your driver is by doing it yourself. When you opt to reshaft your driver yourself, all the money you spend will be on the tools and utensils you need. There will be no extra labor fees or tips you will have to pay for having someone do the work for you.

DIY driver shaft

There are many videos online that show you how to easily replace your driver shaft on your own. Replacing the driver shaft on your own or DIY is a cost-effective way to replace your driver shaft. Some of the adjustable drivers require a ferrule for reshafting. The ferrule should be in suitable shape before you reshaft. A ferrule in an acceptable condition will ensure you get the most satisfactory outcomes from your adjustable driver. A downside of the do it your self driver shaft is that your game will be negatively affected if done improperly.

Removal of the old shaft

Reshafting a Driver: Step-by-Step Guide and Advice

Removing the golf shaft is a straightforward process if done correctly.

Follow these four simple steps when removing the old shaft:

  1. The ferrule is the small plastic band above the hosel; you will want to remove that. Cut a verticle slit in the ferrule using a knife or box cutter. Then using a flat head screwdriver or a pair of pliers, lever the ferrule from the shaft and throw it away.
  2. Place the club in a vise and tighten it for shaft removal. Make sure the club is lying horizontally. The vise should be grabbing the shaft securely. The size of the head should be exposed by approximately eight inches.
  3. Warm the glue inside the hosel; the hosel is where the shaft fits into the clubhead. Using a blow torch, apply heat to the bottom of the hosel. As the warmth is applied, grab the clubhead, turn it, and work it out until it comes off.
  4. Clean out any extra glue from inside the hosel to ensure a good fit. Roll a piece of sandpaper, so it fits in the interior of the hosel to clean out the glue. The twist is to remove loose particles of glue.

Replacement process

Reshafting a Driver: Step-by-Step Guide and Advice

Step-by-step picture guide.

Follow these steps if you plan on reshafting your driver:

  1. The first step to reshafting your driver on your own is securing the club. Place the shaft in a vise and tighten; if the shaft is made of steel. If the ferrule is plastic, use a warm paper towel to prevent the shaft from burning.
  2. Next, you’ll want to remove the existing shaft. Put on a pair of heat-resistant gloves. Heat the hosel of the clubhead with a heat gun for thirty seconds. Twist to release it from the shaft. Use the heat gun for fifteen seconds until the clubhead is entirely disconnected from the shaft.
  3. Prep the new shafts. Suppose your new golf driver is steel, file down the tips. Doing this will ensure the two heads will wed tightly. For any reason that your shaft doesn’t fit into the hosel, use a wire drill bit until it does.
  4. Installing the new shafts is the next step. Cover the tip of the shaft fully in epoxy. Slide the shaft into the hosel and rotate to ensure there are no gaps. Tap the other side of the golf driver against the floor the make sure it is in all the way.
  5. Adjust the shaft as needed. Use a hacksaw to shorten your steel shaft after you allow the epoxy to set for at least two hours. Instead of using a hacksaw, wrap tape around the area you want to cut on graphite shafts. By not following those steps, you run the risk of shattering your graphite shaft.
  6. Finally, the last step is to install the grips. Cleanse the grip with a grip solvent. Wrap the shaft with double-sided tape and cover it entirely in the additional solvent. Glide the grip down the shaft until you reach the bottom. Adjust the grip with your hand since it takes at least five to ten minutes for the solvent to set.

FAQ

  • How long after reshafting can you hit?

How long you have to wait after reshafting depends on the type of epoxy you use. Some fast-acting epoxy will be ready in as little as twenty minutes, but some others will have to be set for twenty-four-hour to forty-eight hours.

  • Why should I reshaft my driver?

You may want to reshaft your driver because it is a great way to keep your clubs working at a high-quality level. It is essential to replace worn-out grips to have them feel like new again and a more comfortable experience.

  • Is it better to bring my driver into a repair shop to be reshafted, or should I replace it myself?

There are both pros and cons of both options. By bringing your driver into a repair shop to be reshafted, you will be paying more money. Still, you know you will be getting a quality job done on it with some sort of guarantee. By reshafting your driver at home, you will be saving money. Still, there if you are not a professional golf repairman, there is no guarantee you won’t mess up on the work. If not done correctly, your game will be affected, and not in a good way.

Final Thoughts

There are many benefits to reshafting a driver, such as improving your golf game. There are even more benefits if you decide to reshaft the driver on your own without bringing it to a pro shop. By doing all of the reshafting yourself, you will save money. Although saving money is an excellent benefit, when not appropriately reshafted, your driver will begin to be detrimental to your game.

References

1.
Netflix teaming up with PGA Tour and golf's majors for 'immersive' docuseries with glittering cast of players - CNN
The streaming service announced on Wednesday it will be teaming up with the PGA Tour and golf’s major championships to release an “immersive documentary series.” The series will follow the lives and stories of some of the biggest names in the sport as they compete across the globe during the 2022 season. The announcement revealed the star-studded cast of golfers it would follow, in a series that will be produced in part by the company behind the “Drive to Survive” series in Formula One which has become so popular.
2.
125 Years After the First College Golf Match, a Rematch
On a fall day in 1896, a group of Yale students, caught up in a new sports craze called golf, traveled from their New Haven, Conn., campus by train and stagecoach to a course north of New York City — one of the few clubs in the country at the time — to take on some chaps from Columbia.
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